Sunday Mornings

Texas, here I come!

My suitcase weighs 49.5 pounds. It is packed to capacity. The other bag is full of shoes. Why a bag just for shoes? Because when you stand on your feet for 12+ hours a day (sometimes running into a theater) one or two pairs of shoes for two weeks is not going to work.

I’m ready for more BBQ and breakfast tacos, familiar faces and a big Texas sky. Plus Whataburger. I’ve been craving it all week.

Keeping it short and sweet on this travel day. Here’s a few odds and ends that have been on my mind lately:

  • A new podcast from the crew of This American Life and Serial! S-Town is here on March 28. I’ll be binging on my flight post-festival, until then no spoilers please!
  • Face palm.
  • ICYMI, Cate Blanchett & Richard Linklater start shooting the adaptation of Where’d You Go, Bernadette this summer.
  • I was sad to hear of the passing of Amy Krouse Rosenthal earlier this month. In case you missed it, grab some kleenex and read one of the of her last (beautiful) essays.
  • One of the tricks about finding a place to live in LA is figuring out how far you are from the freeway or airport, both as a convenience and for all the noise/pollution. You can look up your neighborhood here: National Transportation Noise Map. #NoiseNerd
  • More science to geek out: Scientists Catch Star And Possible Black Hole In A Rapid, Dangerous Dance. Space. is. so. crazy.
  • Late March/early April is FULL of great film festivals. Kudos to all my friends out there making it happening with amazing lineups this year. Indiewire (which use to have larger coverage of film festivals in general) has a post that gives a run down of some announcements.
  • This Tropical Strawberry Hibiscus Rum Spitz cocktail looks so deliciously bright and colorful.
  • This: “At the root of this is the American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working himself to death than to argue that an individual working himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system. The contrast between the gig economy’s rhetoric (everyone is always connecting, having fun, and killing it!) and the conditions that allow it to exist (a lack of dependable employment that pays a living wage) makes this kink in our thinking especially clear. “

Enjoy this lovely spring day! Thanks for reading!

How to avoid the Sundance Flu

Oh the Sundance Flu. It is more reliable than anything else in your life. As reliable as death and taxes.

Everyone I have ever known who has gone to Park City in January for Sundance or Slamdance has gotten sick during or directly after it at least once in their life, if not every year. My worse case was getting strep throat while there and staying in bed for two full dreadful days like an angry zombie while the festival continued on. There is nothing worse than being sick and not in your own bed.

It always starts out the same way. The entire film industry descends from Los Angeles and New York City – plus everywhere in between – and inundates a small ski town. You see old friends and colleagues as soon as you board the flight to Salt Lake City (airplane germs), then in the airport (more germs), then the grocery store (store germs), then the Marriott headquarters (hotel germs). You shake EVERYONE’S hand. There are hugs too.

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A crowded bus in Park City.

It’s chilly. Snow covers the surrounding ski slopes. Someone has a little sniffle here or a cough there, but it’s not a big deal. They’re just getting use to the altitude. It reminds you to drink some water. As the days go on, the coughing in the tight, long lines become more frequent. Every where you go you are in a petri dish of germs: the crowded shuttle buses, the tents of lines, the theaters, the bars. You meet people and shake hands. You have a drink because 1) that last movie crushed your soul and 2) you are attending your third reception for the night and the alcohol is free. You’re eating the small passed appetizer from the party because it’s the only thing you’ve had to eat in six hours. And so is everyone else with their germ-ridden hands. You stay out late. You are walking – no, you’re brushing against people – uphill/downhill on a crowded Main Street in the cold, multiple times during the night. You wake up early. You get back on a germ-covered bus. You get back in line. The sneezing follows you.

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Waiting in line at Sundance 2016.

Your hands dry out from the repeat washings and cold, harsh air. You get more coffee and your body wonders why you are still going. There’s a tickle in your throat. You take more airborne/Ibprofen/bourbon and move on. Your layers sit on your lap in the theater because the heaters are blowing at full speed above you, then bundle up quickly when you walk outside. Layers on and off… constantly. You hear rumors of so-and-so staying in because they feel sick. More uphill walking for blocks because the germ-buses are full.

You realize you need tissues all the time and not because the movies are making you cry. You try to hide your sneeze or cough. The plague is coming for you and there’s no way to hide it. It will either get you in Park City or as soon as you get home (because before you get home, all these flu-ridden people will get back on an airplane with you).

So how to avoid this? Well there are lots of theories and everyone has a technique to avoid the Sundance Flu. Obviously washing hands is a no-brainer. If you aren’t, then eww on you. How much it helps here is up for debate. Hand sanitizer is your friend.Take your vitamins before and during the trip. Hydrate. All.The.Time. Sleep is key too. Each person knows how many hours they can function on before all hell breaks loose. An extra hour of sleep can make or break you. The gamble: whether or not to miss a morning movie if it keeps you from getting sick. Eating helps too. I know it sounds dumb, but as I’ve written about before, you’d be surprised how eating regularly during a festival can be crazy hard. I believe the parties are where the immune system gives up though. As friend and fellow programmer Lane Kneedler likes to preach: “see more movies than parties.”

Some of the best advice I’ve ever heard and adhered to is simple: don’t touch your face. Just don’t do it. Don’t scratch your face. Use tissues if you’re wiping your face/mouth/nose. Think about it: how many times do you randomly touch your face in a given day? It’s way more than you think. Try to not touch your face for ten days (plus the other stuff above) and you may have a sliver of a chance to stay healthy while festing in Park City. If you do get sick, there’s the urgent care center which has been frequented by most Sundance attendees at some point. Including myself. They’ll be ready for you.

No guarantee the Sundance flu won’t strike you once you’re home though. Good luck!